History

Our Story 

Policing has always been an important component to the way of life for the Blood Reserve and its people. 

Traditionally the Tribe had a fully developed legal system and its own enforcement agency in the form of a society called Iikunuhkahtsi to apply the laws. However, as the European systems began to overlay the ways of the tribe, policing and other areas of social services adapted and have continued to become an integral part of the Blood Tribe community. 

To suit the particular context and needs of its people, the Blood Tribe adopted the Tribal Scout system which later evolved into the Blood Tribe Police Service.

 

Our Service 

The Blood Indian Reserve (BIR# 148 & 148A) is the largest First Nations reservation in Canada. Covering well over 180 000 hectares of land in Southern Alberta, it is the proud home to over 10 000 registered members. 

Basing its operations out of offices in Standoff, Alberta, the Blood Tribe Police Service is a fully autonomous police agency with jurisdiction that extends from the outskirts of the city of Lethbridge to the bordering towns of Cardston, Hill Spring, Glenwood, Fort Macleod and Waterton Lakes National Park. 

Twenty-four hours, seven days a week coverage is provided by thirty three fully appointed police officers with the support of over twenty six full time civilian staff members. Provincially and federally recognized training, a large fleet of police vehicles, state of the art blood alcohol testing equipment, and full access to services such as the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC), and the Police Reporting and Occurrence System (PROS) are just some of the resources utilized by the Blood Tribe Police Service. 

The Blood Tribe Police Service in its present form is a continuation of the Blood Reserve in partnership with the Federal and Provincial Governments' efforts in providing quality policing services to the community.

Governance


Police Commission

Members:

Mary Fox, Chair
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Rebecca Many Grey Horses, Public Complaint Director
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Joanne Lemieux, Blood Tribe Council Representative
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The Blood Tribe Police Commission currently consists of four (2) community members and one (1) council representative. During this reporting year there have been many overall changes with the assistance of the Chief of Police and the local government (Chief and Council). The Commission meets once a month with the Chief of Police and with the Federal and Provincial representatives.


To submit a praise or complaint about an officer, please email:

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or call

403-915-6810

or visit

About Us

Our Story

Policing has always been an important component to the way of life for the Blood Reserve and its people.

Traditionally the Tribe had a fully developed legal system and its own enforcement agency in the form of a society called Iikunuhkahtsi to apply the laws. However, as the European systems began to overlay the ways of the tribe, policing and other areas of social services adapted and have continued to become an integral part of the Blood Tribe community.

To suit the particular context and needs of its people, the Blood Tribe adopted the Tribal Scout system which later evolved into the Blood Tribe Police Service.

Our Service

The Blood Indian Reserve (BIR# 148 & 148A) is the largest First Nations reservation in Canada. Covering well over 180 000 hectares of land in Southern Alberta, it is the proud home to over 10 000 registered members.

Basing its operations out of offices in Standoff, Alberta, the Blood Tribe Police Service is a fully autonomous police agency with jurisdiction that extends from the outskirts of the city of Lethbridge to the bordering towns of Cardston, Hill Spring, Glenwood, Fort Macleod and Waterton Lakes National Park.

Twenty-four hours, seven days a week coverage is provided by thirty three fully appointed police officers with the support of over a dozen civillian staff members. Provincially and federally recognized training, a large fleet of police vehicles, state of the art blood alcohol testing equipment, and full access to services such as the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC), and the Police Reporting and Occurence System (PROS) are just some of the resources utilized by the Blood Tribe Police Service.

The Blood Tribe Police Service in its present form is a continuation of the Blood Reserve in partnership with the Federal and Provincial Governments' efforts in providing quality policing services to the community.

Read more: About Us

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